Will Pakistan Become a Theocracy? III

talibothra

I.

Dear NYT editorial page,

Let’s talk.

I know you are really into this ____ miles from Islamabad schtick. It is a good schtick. Mainly because your dwindling readership cannot actually place Islamabad on a map. Nor do they have any sense of its physicality. Can you name a prominent landmark in Islamabad? Do you know what the terrain looks like? Precisely because it is an indeterminate space, you can project on it the Mothra Flies Towards Tokyo scenario that seems to be moving so much copy lately.
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The Silence of the Lawyers Movement

Naim Sahib in Outlook India on the plight of Sikh families under the Swat deal: Islamic ‘Adl in Orakzai. It is worth reading in full, and I wanted to highlight this pertinent call to the lawyers movement…
[glossary: ‘adl (justice), jizya (property tax levied on conquered populations), dhimmis (non-Muslims under Muslim rule), fiqh (jurisprudence), bid’ah (innovation, bad), `ushr (annual tax on Muslim) ]
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South Asia: The Field

If one was interested in plunging the murky depths of the ways in which US academia began to study “South Asia” – specifically within the Area Studies framework, one could begin with these preliminary sources:

  • W. Norman Brown. “South Asia Studies: A History,” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 356 (1964: 54-62)
  • Maureen L. P. Patterson. “The South Asian P. L. 480 Library Program, 1962-1968,” Journal of Asian Studies. vol. 38, no. 4 (1969: 743-54).
  • Ford Foundation. Annual Report: 1956.
  • The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Annual Report: 1965, 1983, 1985
  • Richard H. Davis. South Asia at Chicago: A History. (Chicago: COSAS New Series, no. 1, 1985).
  • Nicholas B. Dirks. “South Asian Studies: Futures Past.” In ed. David Szanton, The Politics of Knowledge: Area Studies and the Disciplines (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003): 341-86.
  • Timothy Mitchell. “The Middle East in the Past and Future of Social Science.” In ed. David Szanton, The Politics of Knowledge: Area Studies and the Disciplines (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003): 74-118.
  • Nils Gilman. Mandarins of the Future: Modernization Theory in Cold War America. (2003: Johns Hopkins University Press)
  • Bruce Cumings. “Boundary Displacement: Area Studies and International Studies During and After the Cold War,” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, vol 29 (1997)

Just letting you all know.